Amtrak's Southwest Chief, seen here pulling into Kansas City's Union Station Friday morning, October 25, 2013, travels a historic route across western Kansas that needs millions of dollars in repairs. BNSF, one of North America's largest freight rail companies, owns the line but uses it sparingly. If Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico can't come up with roughly $100 million in the next few years, the train will have to find another track. Dozens of rural communities depend on the train, including some far from airports and interstates.
Amtrak's Southwest Chief, seen here pulling into Kansas City's Union Station Friday morning, October 25, 2013, travels a historic route across western Kansas that needs millions of dollars in repairs. BNSF, one of North America's largest freight rail companies, owns the line but uses it sparingly. If Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico can't come up with roughly $100 million in the next few years, the train will have to find another track. Dozens of rural communities depend on the train, including some far from airports and interstates. Kansas City Star/MCT
Amtrak's Southwest Chief, seen here pulling into Kansas City's Union Station Friday morning, October 25, 2013, travels a historic route across western Kansas that needs millions of dollars in repairs. BNSF, one of North America's largest freight rail companies, owns the line but uses it sparingly. If Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico can't come up with roughly $100 million in the next few years, the train will have to find another track. Dozens of rural communities depend on the train, including some far from airports and interstates. Kansas City Star/MCT

Economy

October 28, 2013 6:00 AM

Without federal aid, Amtrak could leave rural areas behind

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