Economy

Economy

Trump’s Interior pick could signal revival of Northwest coal export terminal

Donald Trump’s selection of Montana Rep. Ryan Zinke to lead the Interior Department could signal the revival of a much-debated coal-export terminal in Northwest Washington state that’s pitted industry groups and unions against environmental and community groups, and two Indian tribes against each other. In Congress, Zinke has been a staunch supporter of the Gateway Pacific Terminal, a $600 million facility in Whatcom County, Washington, that would export about 48 million tons a year of coal mined in western states to Pacific Rim markets.

Economy

Candidate Trump said he ‘digs coal.’ His key Cabinet appointments favor natural gas

To be sure, Trump’s choices of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to be EPA administrator, ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson to be secretary of state, and former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to be energy secretary could boost fossil fuels generally. But all three have been big promoters of the production of natural gas through hydraulic fracturing, and the resulting abundance of cheap natural gas has displaced a large volume of coal in the nation’s power sector.

Economy

Trump’s intensifying tone on Cuba could impact Texas business interests

President-elect Donald Trump heightened his criticism of Cuba after Fidel Castro’s death, tweeting that he is willing to “terminate” recently negotiated trade relations with the United States and Cuba. That could be bad news for Texas agricultural and business interests, as trade with Cuba represents an untapped and potentially lucrative market.

Economy

Donald Trump’s anti-trade rhetoric puts Texas Republicans in a bind

President-elect Donald Trump continues to rail against trade agreements like the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership and the North American Free Trade Agreement, which puts pro-trade Texas Republicans in a bind. Agricultural interests in Texas say the state benefits from increased trade abroad and that Trump’s rollback of the two pacts could be a job-killer in the state.

Economy

Business as usual? Bankrupt coal giant is still paying for DC lobbyists

Though Peabody Energy, the world’s largest coal producer, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in April, it has still paid its lobbyists $1.2 million this year, according to federal disclosures. Among the company’s lobbyists: several former congressional staffers and three former members of Congress, including one-time House Democratic leader and two-time presidential candidate Dick Gephardt of Missouri.

Economy

These coal companies went broke, yet their PACs found money to give to candidates

The political action committees of coal companies, currently or recently in bankruptcy, have spent more than $800,000 in state and federal campaigns this year, according to the Federal Election Commission. The PACs of the largest three, Alpha Natural Resources, Arch Coal and Peabody Energy, put more than $659,000 into federal races. Those companies and another, Patriot Coal, put more than $165,000 into state races.

Videos

Trump touts 'America first' message at CPAC

President Donald Trump criticized the news media and 'fake news,' talked about cracking down on illegal immigration, blasted Obama care, and touted his plan to put "America first" at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday.
C-SPAN
Trump touts 'America first' message at CPAC 6:51

Trump touts 'America first' message at CPAC

Trump to CPAC: I wouldn't miss a chance to talk to my friends 2:17

Trump to CPAC: I wouldn't miss a chance to talk to my friends

The White House says transgender policies best left to the states 0:50

The White House says transgender policies best left to the states

White House: Administration plans to take action on recreational marijuana 2:29

White House: Administration plans to take action on recreational marijuana