Apple CEO Tim Cook has rejected a court’s order to help the FBI break into a work-issued iPhone used by one of the two gunmen in the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The rejection of the order sets up a court battle that could lead to Congress taking action to clarify whether privacy or security deserves priority.
Apple CEO Tim Cook has rejected a court’s order to help the FBI break into a work-issued iPhone used by one of the two gunmen in the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The rejection of the order sets up a court battle that could lead to Congress taking action to clarify whether privacy or security deserves priority. Luca Bruno AP
Apple CEO Tim Cook has rejected a court’s order to help the FBI break into a work-issued iPhone used by one of the two gunmen in the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The rejection of the order sets up a court battle that could lead to Congress taking action to clarify whether privacy or security deserves priority. Luca Bruno AP

Apple headed for showdown over San Bernardino shooter’s phone

February 17, 2016 07:58 PM

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