Rob Jacobs, (center), a member of North Carolina’s Lumbee Tribe, wore his eagle feathers at a Lumbee powwow. Since the tribe is not recognized by the federal government, Jacobs violates the Bald Eagle Protection Act whenever he wears his feathers. Only members of federally-recognized tribes are allowed to wear the feathers for religious or cultural purposes.
Rob Jacobs, (center), a member of North Carolina’s Lumbee Tribe, wore his eagle feathers at a Lumbee powwow. Since the tribe is not recognized by the federal government, Jacobs violates the Bald Eagle Protection Act whenever he wears his feathers. Only members of federally-recognized tribes are allowed to wear the feathers for religious or cultural purposes. McClatchy
Rob Jacobs, (center), a member of North Carolina’s Lumbee Tribe, wore his eagle feathers at a Lumbee powwow. Since the tribe is not recognized by the federal government, Jacobs violates the Bald Eagle Protection Act whenever he wears his feathers. Only members of federally-recognized tribes are allowed to wear the feathers for religious or cultural purposes. McClatchy

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