Aaron Rhyner, 29, of Tacoma, Wash., who works for the Puyallup Tribal Health Authority, examined an 8-year-old patient on July 30, 2014. He’s a third-year resident in the Puyallup tribal residency program for medical school graduates and one of 550 in the U.S. whose work is financed by the Affordable Care Act passed by Congress in 2010.
Aaron Rhyner, 29, of Tacoma, Wash., who works for the Puyallup Tribal Health Authority, examined an 8-year-old patient on July 30, 2014. He’s a third-year resident in the Puyallup tribal residency program for medical school graduates and one of 550 in the U.S. whose work is financed by the Affordable Care Act passed by Congress in 2010. McClatchy
Aaron Rhyner, 29, of Tacoma, Wash., who works for the Puyallup Tribal Health Authority, examined an 8-year-old patient on July 30, 2014. He’s a third-year resident in the Puyallup tribal residency program for medical school graduates and one of 550 in the U.S. whose work is financed by the Affordable Care Act passed by Congress in 2010. McClatchy

National

August 05, 2014 5:27 PM

With funds for physician training set to expire, rural doctor shortage persists

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