MIT chemist Daniel Nocera uses solar energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen and store them in a fuel cell where they can generate electricity at night or on cloudy days. He calls the process "artificial photosynthesis."
MIT chemist Daniel Nocera uses solar energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen and store them in a fuel cell where they can generate electricity at night or on cloudy days. He calls the process "artificial photosynthesis." Donna Coveney / MCT
MIT chemist Daniel Nocera uses solar energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen and store them in a fuel cell where they can generate electricity at night or on cloudy days. He calls the process "artificial photosynthesis." Donna Coveney / MCT

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August 17, 2008 6:00 AM

Researchers hunt for energy in strange places

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