Courts & Crime

Courts & Crime

Police record themselves conspiring to retaliate against protester

On September 11, 2015, Connecticut resident Michael Picard was filming a protest near a police DUI checkpoint in West Hartford. Unbeknownst to the troopers who confiscated his camera, it was rolling while they appeared to fabricate criminal charges against him. The ACLU of Connecticut sued the police officers for violating Picard’s rights.

Courts & Crime

What happens when 4-star Air Force general is accused of sexual assault?

The Air Force investigation of sexual assault allegations against retired four-star Gen. Arthur Lichte, a former commander of the U.S. Air Mobility Command, renews a debate about how the military handles such cases and whether commanders should even have the responsibility of prosecuting one of their own. According to military justice experts, there’s very little guidance on how to prosecute such high-ranking officers and there are significant barriers to doing so.

Courts & Crime

Exonerations in America are at a record high, but not because of DNA

In the late 1980s, the use of DNA evidence in criminal investigations set the stage for a wave of exonerations in the United States. Armed with this new tool, attorneys and advocacy groups from across the country were able to overturn hundreds of convictions. But in recent years, as the inclusion of DNA evidence in trials has become standard practice, DNA-based exonerations have flatlined. Instead, the exonerations of the future seem to be coming from debunking the use of decades-old, flawed investigative tactics, such as bite mark analysis and forced confessions.

Courts & Crime

Why 2015 was a record year for the wrongfully convicted

Since 2013, the number of conviction integrity units, a division of a prosecutor’s office that seeks to identify and correct false convictions, has more than doubled, rising from 12 counties to more than 26 across the country. As a result, more people were exonerated in 2015 than in any previous year. And the state leading the way? Texas.

Videos

Police record themselves conspiring to retaliate against protester

On September 11, 2015, Connecticut resident Michael Picard was filming a protest near a police DUI checkpoint in West Hartford. Unbeknownst to the troopers who confiscated his camera, it was rolling while they appeared to fabricate criminal charges against him. The ACLU of Connecticut sued the police officers for violating Picard’s rights.
ACLU
Police record themselves conspiring to retaliate against protester 2:52

Police record themselves conspiring to retaliate against protester

Elizabeth Warren to Wells Fargo CEO: 'You should resign' 1:27

Elizabeth Warren to Wells Fargo CEO: 'You should resign'

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf Apologizes To Senate Banking Committee 1:51

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf Apologizes To Senate Banking Committee

Public service announcement warns teens about 'sextortion' 2:13

Public service announcement warns teens about 'sextortion'