Courts & Crime

Courts & Crime

Exonerations in America are at a record high, but not because of DNA

In the late 1980s, the use of DNA evidence in criminal investigations set the stage for a wave of exonerations in the United States. Armed with this new tool, attorneys and advocacy groups from across the country were able to overturn hundreds of convictions. But in recent years, as the inclusion of DNA evidence in trials has become standard practice, DNA-based exonerations have flatlined. Instead, the exonerations of the future seem to be coming from debunking the use of decades-old, flawed investigative tactics, such as bite mark analysis and forced confessions.

Courts & Crime

Why 2015 was a record year for the wrongfully convicted

Since 2013, the number of conviction integrity units, a division of a prosecutor’s office that seeks to identify and correct false convictions, has more than doubled, rising from 12 counties to more than 26 across the country. As a result, more people were exonerated in 2015 than in any previous year. And the state leading the way? Texas.

Videos

FBI Director James Comey defends his decision to not prosecute Hillary Clinton

Two days after recommending Hillary Clinton not be prosecuted for her use of a private email server, FBI Director James Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee on the FBI’s investigation into the case, and the decision to not recommend criminal charges against her.
C-SPAN
FBI Director James Comey defends his decision to not prosecute Hillary Clinton 2:11

FBI Director James Comey defends his decision to not prosecute Hillary Clinton

U.S. Attorney General responds to N.C.'s HB2 lawsuit 2:28

U.S. Attorney General responds to N.C.'s HB2 lawsuit

Widow told she cannot release body cam footage of husband's death 17:21

Widow told she cannot release body cam footage of husband's death

First day in court for Tonya Couch, mother of 4:16

First day in court for Tonya Couch, mother of "affluenza" teen