Greg Gordon

Can Fed reverse stock market slide, stagnant economy?

All eyes will be on the Federal Reserve on Tuesday as it meets to weigh what else it can possibly do to reverse Monday's steep slide in stocks and boost investor sentiment amid fears of Recession 2.0. | 08/08/11 19:36:00 By - Kevin G. Hall and Greg Gordon

Judge allows feds to revise filing in anthrax case

Justice Department lawyers, defending a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of the first victim of the 2001 anthrax letter attacks, won a judge's approval Friday to withdraw a court filing that seemed to undermine the FBI's assertion that an Army researcher was the killer. | 07/29/11 19:07:00 By - Mike Wiser, Greg Gordon and Stephen Engelberg

Judge: U.S. must show 'good cause' to revise anthrax filing

A federal judge has blocked, at least temporarily, a Justice Department attempt to back away from court admissions that appeared to undercut previous FBI assertions that an Army researcher was responsible for the 2001 anthrax attacks. | 07/27/11 19:57:00 By - Mike Wiser, Greg Gordon and Stephen Engelberg

Experts: Justice Department waffling in anthrax case could be costly

Waffling by Justice Department lawyers in a wrongful death lawsuit that arose from the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks could boost prospects that the government will be liable for millions in damages for failing to prevent the killing of a Florida man. | 07/20/11 19:57:00 By - Greg Gordon, Steve Engelberg and Mike Wiser

Justice Department retracts court filings that undercut FBI's anthrax case

Rushing into court to undo a major gaffe, Justice Department lawyers defending a civil suit Tuesday retracted statements that seemed to undercut the FBI's finding that a former Army microbiologist mailed the anthrax-filled letters that killed five people in 2001. | 07/19/11 20:20:00 By - Greg Gordon, Mike Wiser and Stephen Engelberg

New twist in anthrax case; Justice Department lawyers contradict FBI findings

The Justice Department has called into question a key pillar of the FBI's case against Bruce Ivins, the Army scientist accused of mailing the anthrax-laced letters that killed five people and terrorized Congress a decade ago. | 07/18/11 19:18:00 By - Mike Wiser, Greg Gordon and Stephen Engelberg

Ex-Ohio attorney general picked to lead consumer finance watchdog agency

President Barack Obama will nominate Richard Cordray, who as Ohio's attorney general was a leader in state policing of financial industry abuses, to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that formally opens its doors this week, the White House said Sunday. | 07/17/11 14:42:00 By - Greg Gordon

Goldman gets subpoena over risky mortgage deals

In the absence of federal prosecutions over Wall Street's role in the nation's financial crisis, the Manhattan district attorney has subpoenaed Goldman Sachs regarding allegations that the giant investment bank bet heavily against its clients in risky mortgage deals, two people familiar with the matter said Thursday. | 06/02/11 19:00:49 By - Greg Gordon

Rep. Nadler presses FBI for anthrax information

A senior member of the House of Representatives is pressing the FBI to explain why he apparently was sent "incomplete and misleading" information that concealed a lab test showing a soaring level of silicon in one of the anthrax-laden letters that killed five people in 2001. | 05/26/11 17:56:00 By - Greg Gordon

FBI lab reports on anthrax attacks suggest another miscue

Buried in FBI laboratory reports about the anthrax mail attacks that killed five people in 2001 is data suggesting that a chemical may have been added to try to heighten the powder's potency, a move that some experts say exceeded the expertise of the presumed killer. The apparent failure of the FBI to pursue this avenue of investigation raises the ominous possibility that the killer is still on the loose. | 05/19/11 17:02:00 By - Greg Gordon

Is it time to revisit scope and cost of war on terror?

From buying nuclear radiation detectors to putting droves of air marshals on passenger flights, the U.S. government has spent hundreds of billions of dollars since the Sept. 11 attacks to build defenses around every major target of terrorism. The death of Osama bin Laden doesn't end those threats. | 05/03/11 18:40:00 By - Greg Gordon and Marisa Taylor

How could Pakistan not know bin Laden was hiding there?

The U.S. military's successful takeout of Osama bin Laden raised big questions — and a chorus of skepticism — about whether Pakistan's military and intelligence services knew all along that the global terrorist leader was hiding in their back yard. | 05/02/11 20:31:00 By - Greg Gordon, David Goldstein and Jonathan S. Landay

Bin Laden's violent legacy stretches back decades

Osama bin Laden earned his combat spurs by fighting with Afghanistan's ragtag Mujahadeen army to drive occupying Soviet troops out of their homeland in the 1980s. Bin Laden, though, had a far bigger vision, one that would lead him to be reviled by Western civilization. | 05/02/11 00:52:00 By - Greg Gordon

Was FBI too quick to judge anthrax suspect the killer?

Scouring the anthrax-laced mail that took five lives and terrorized the East Coast in 2001, laboratory scientists discovered a unique contaminant — a tiny scientific fingerprint that they hoped would help unmask the killer. Yet once FBI agents concluded that the likely culprit was Bruce Ivins, they stopped looking for the contaminant. That decision could reignite the debate over whether its agents found the real killer. | 04/20/11 17:11:00 By - Greg Gordon

While Goldman raked in profits, clients squirmed

With the housing market deteriorating rapidly in 2008, Morgan Stanley traders wanted to sell off hundreds of millions of dollars in securities positions that had been downgraded by credit ratings agencies and recover what money they could. But as the deal's liquidation manager, Goldman Sachs had plenty of reasons for resisting. | 04/14/11 20:06:00 By - Greg Gordon

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