Smaller group returns for second Occupy Myrtle Beach

The Sun-NewsOctober 30, 2011 

Even though smaller group assembled Saturday in Myrtle Beach for their second Occupy Myrtle Beach, they had hopes for expansion to get their messages out in the community.

Following a similar format to the inaugural meeting, which was held last week, people signed up and spoke to the group for five minutes about their thoughts on the Occupy Wall Street movement, changing government and demonstrating locally.

“It takes us all wanting to come together and make change happen,” said Terry Mason Hendricks. “We have to get organized.”

She suggested a website where information could be published about upcoming events and demonstrations.

The group agreed they do not know who operates the social media sites dedicated to Occupy Myrtle Beach nor do they know who purchased Internet domain names related to the cause. A couple of people facilitated the event reading off names from a notebook where people signed up to speak to the group.

Other people in the crowd used video cameras to record the speeches.

The Occupy Wall Street movement got its start on Sept. 17 in Liberty Square in Manhattan’s financial district. It’s since spread across the U.S. – including Charleston and Columbia – and more than 1,500 across the globe.

On Saturday, Occupy Myrtle Beach attendees, including some who declined to be identified, referenced the 2006 movie “V for Vendetta” while speaking to the group and one man wore a mask on his arm similar to the used by the lead character in the movie.

The movie and a comic book series followed a man known as “V” as he fought against a totalitarian society.

About 40 people attended the assembly, which was a smaller crowd from the previous week, where attendees reported nearly 100 people.

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