Bin Laden down, 29 more to go on FBI most wanted list

Sacramento BeeMay 5, 2011 

Osama bin Laden may have been the most wanted man in the world until Monday, but the FBI still has a list of 29 other men it considers the "most wanted" terrorists in the world, including three facing charges in California.

Here, in alphabetical order, are the suspected California terrorists:

Zulkifli Abdhir, believed to be 44 or 45, was born in Malaysia but trained as an engineer in the United States. He is the subject of a $5 million reward and was indicted in federal court in San Jose in 2007 on charges of of providing material support to terrorists and other counts. U.S. officials believe he is the head of the Kumpulun Mujahidin Malaysia terrorist organization and that he has been hiding in the Philippines since 2003, where he allegedly teaches bomb making and other terror activities.

Abdhir was accused in an indictment of plotting with his brother, a San Jose resident, to have various materials shipped to him in the Philippines, including "accessories for firearms, backpacks, Insignia two-way radios, knives and publications about firearms."

Court documents indicate that he and his brother corresponded in code in various emails, referring to firearms as "iron," government agents as "dogs" and bombs or IEDs as "prizes" and "presents."

He also apparently had a chocolate fetish. One package his brother allegedly tried to mail to him contained a rifle scope, a Marine Corps rifle manual, ammunition magazines, two bags of bite-size Snickers bars and a bag of Hershey's chocolate, the indictment states.

The brother, Rahmat Abdhir, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists and was sentenced last August to 120 months in federal prison.

Adam Yahiye Gadahn, 32, is an American citizen who is believed to be a public face of Al Qaeda. The State Department has offered a $1 million reward for his capture, and he is wanted on charges of treason and offering material support to Al Qaeda.

Gadahn, once known as Adam Pearlman, was raised on a Riverside County goat farm and is the son of a man who converted from Judaism to Christianity. Gadahn was obsessed with demonic heavy metal music but converted to Islam when he was 17. He has indicated his conversion came after moving in with his grandmother in Santa Ana, a computer enthusiast. While living with her, he became involved in Islamic chat sites. Three years ago, as then-President Bush was preparing to visit the Middle East, Gadahn appeared on an Al Qaeda videotape urging terrorists to greet his visit with attacks. He also tore up his U.S. passport on the hour-long video.

Daniel Andreas San Diego, 33, was born in Berkeley and is wanted in connection with the bombing of two separate buildings in San Francisco in August and September 2003. Authorities have offered a $250,000 reward for his capture.

San Diego, a computer specialist and vegan who is believed to have ties to extremist animal rights groups, is believed to have targeted corporations in the buildings because he believed they had ties to a British firm that used animals in product testing, a contention at least one of the firms denied.

The first attack was at a building in Emeryville, where two bombs exploded an hour apart. The second was at a Pleasanton building where a bomb strapped with nails exploded.

San Diego, an accomplished sailor, also has distinctive tattoos. The FBI says one on his chest has "a round image of burning hillsides" with the words "It only takes a spark" printed below. On the sides of his abdomen and his back he has images of "burning and collapsing buildings," the FBI said, and in the middle of his lower back he has "a single leafless tree rising from a road."

The tattoos, the FBI noted, "may have been significantly altered or covered with new tattoos."

See a gallery of the remaining most wanted at SacBee.com

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