Read the rulings in the decided cases

Miami HeraldSeptember 7, 2009 

The habeas rulings to date:

Oct. 7, 2008: Judge Ricardo M. Urbina’s orders release of 17 citizens of China, ethnic Muslims called Uighurs, after nearly seven years of U.S. military custody. Four now live in Bermuda; 13 await resettlement in a third country because they fear persecution if they were sent back to their communist ruled homeland. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

Nov. 20, 2008: Judge Richard J. Leon, orders release of five Algerians who were handed over to U.S. forces in Bosnia-Herzegovina and sent to Guantanamo, and upholds the detention of a sixth. Three went to Algeria, another to France and a fifth is at Guantanamo seeking third country resettlement. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Dec. 30, 2008: Judge Leon upholds the detention of Yemeni Moath al Alwi, ruling that he had fought with the Taliban during the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan after Sept. 11, 2001. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Dec. 30, 2008: Judge Leon upholds the detention of Tunisian Hisham Sliti, ruling he likely traveled from London to Afghanistan in mid 2000 as an al Qaeda recruit. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Jan. 14, 2009: Judge Leon orders the release Mohammed el Gharani of Chad, finding that the government provided no corroborating evidence of how a minor from a poor family in Saudi Arabia could become a member of a London based terror cell. He was released in June. Click here to read the judge's ruling

# Jan. 28, 2008: Judge Leon upholds the detention of Yemeni Ghaleb Nassar al Bihani, ruling that he aided the enemy in Afghanistan by serving as a cook for the Taliban. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# April 2, 2009: Judge Leon upholds the detention Tunisian Hadi Hammamy, ruling that the former resident of Italy was likely at the battle of Tora Bora. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# April 15, 2009: Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle orders the release Yemeni Yassin Muhammed Basardh, who acted as an informant on other detainees at Guantanamo. He is still at Guantanamo. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# May 11, 2009: Judge Gladys Kessler orders the release of Yemeni Alla Ali Ahmed, saying the government’s mosaic theory of association with terrorism did not meet the burden. He is still at Guantanamo. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# June 22, 2009: Judge Leon orders the release Syrian Abdulrahim Janko, saying his detention as a war prisoner "defies common sense" in part because he had been held and tortured by the Taliban or al Qaeda in the 18 months prior to his capture by U.S. troops in Afghanistan. He is still at Guantánamo. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# July 29, 2009: Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly orders the release of Kuwaiti Khalid Mutairi, ruling that the government case offered nothing but speculation that he had trained or was associated with al Qaeda before his 2001 capture in Afghanistan. He is still at Guantánamo. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# July 30, 2009: Judge Huvelle orders the release of Afghan Mohammed Jawad after declaring the government case in a “shambles” because a military judge had earlier ruled the young man’s confession was obtained through torture in his native Afghanistan. He was freed Aug. 24. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Aug. 12, 2009: Judge James Robertson upholds the detention of Yemeni Ali Awad, agreeing that he trained with al Qaeda and then holed up in an Afghan hospital in a bloody standoff early in the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Aug. 17, 2009: Judge Gladys Kessler orders the release of Yemeni Mohammed al Adahi, saying that he may have attended a party with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan but he washed out of al Qaeda training. He is still at Guantánamo. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

# Aug. 23, 2009: Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly upholds the detention of Kuwaiti Fawzi al Odah since his capture in December 2001 in Afghanistan, in a ruling that concluded he he served as an al Qaeda or Taliban foot soldier. Al Odah's lawyers had filed the oldest, longest-running unlawful detention lawsuit at the federal court. Click here to read the judge's ruling.

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